selenak: (Three and Jo by Calapine)
( Oct. 1st, 2014 08:13 am)
Fandom can be frustrating sometimes, but it is also excellent for distracting from a depressing rl experience. Therefore, something which worked on me this morning:

When Jo Grant met Twelve, aka, Katy Manning and Peter Capaldi are adorable and I love them. Also someone should create an icon from this picture.

Marvelverse fanfiction:

Tinker Tailor Super-Soldier Spy (13726 words) by littlerhymes
Chapters: 1/1
Fandom: Captain America (Movies)
Rating: Teen And Up Audiences
Warnings: Graphic Depictions Of Violence
Relationships: Nick Fury/Alexander Pierce
Characters: Nick Fury, Steve Rogers, Peggy Carter, Alexander Pierce, James "Bucky" Barnes, Jim Morita
Additional Tags: Alternate Universe - Canon Divergence, Alternate Origin Story, Cold War, Spies & Secret Agents, Action/Adventure
Summary:

Steve survives World War II. In 1972, he and Director Carter team up with a young Nick Fury to investigate a mission gone wrong.



Described by the author as writing Captain America: The Winter Soldier, the scriptwriters of which sasid they were going for a 1970s thriller type of story, as an actual 1970s thriller. Therefore, Steve Rogers never ended up frozen. What I love about this retelling/AU, not confined to, but mainly: 1) It's Nick Fury centric (Nick Fury doesn't get enough love in this fandom), 2.) Director Peggy Carter in her 50s is awesome, 2.) While the backstory is that she and Steve split up some time as a couple some time after the war because she didn't want to be Mrs. Captain America and he wasn't comfortable with her Director-of-SHIELD ambiguity, they're still firm friends, which isn't just claimed but shown, and best of all, the split didn't happen just so the story can get Steve together with Bucky (who spends it, as he does the movie, in the not-conductive-to-romance brainwashed Winter Soldier state).
selenak: (Old School by Khalls_stuff)
( Sep. 29th, 2014 01:34 pm)
I just found out Maggie Stables died. . Peaceful and in her sleep, which is a good way to go, of course. But Evelyn Smythe, whom she played on the Big Finish audio adventures, was such a great character. As Colin Baker says, she was the definite Sixth Doctor Companion; she redefined him. And their audible chemistry was just delightful.

Perhaps because she was the first Companion who was introduced as an older person, Evelyn dealing with her mortality - not the chance she could be killed during an adventure, but the normal human fragility of her aging body - was a red thread through many of her adventures. A bit like Laura Roslin on BSG who gets introduced in the scene in which she gets her terminal diagnosis, and whose survival beyond the end of the show would have felt like cheating, Big Finish didn't just tease out this with Evelyn. And because the audio adventures don't have to happen in a linear fashion, we got Evelyn's goodbyes - to her Doctor, the sixth one, in Thicker than Water, and to the seventh one in A Death in the Family - without this meaning the end of Evelyn; there were adventures starring her made after this which simply preceded those goodbyes in chronological fashion. And Maggie Stables never sounded weary or routine-esque. I recently heard two adventures which paired her and the Doctor with Victorian trickster Thomas Brewster, and Evelyn sounded as vibrantly compelling as ever. Even when, in a spacesuit, she faced possible death (again) and still loved the wonder of the moment.

I'm so glad Big Finish cast Maggie Stables as this wonderful character. We could say goodbye to Evelyn, knowing it was au revoir really because of that non-linearity of adventures. Not anymore, and yet, those goodbyes feel a bit comforting now. I think I'll listen to them again.
selenak: (Brig by Kathyh)
( Sep. 29th, 2014 06:05 am)
Operation Catch Up With TV continues with a round of WHAT ABOUT THE BRIG?

Gareth Roberts usually gives good comedy, but this seriously distracted me )
Which was fun. You could tell Moffat and Thompson always wanted to write a heist movie. And the purpose-of-heist-twist made it very Whovian indeed.

Read more... )
selenak: (Breaking Bad by Wicked Signs)
( Sep. 21st, 2014 09:56 am)
Briefly: am in the gorgeous Southern Tyrolia alps with the APs, must use the finally arrived sunshine, off to hike now, hence will be able to watch the latest Doctor Who not earlier than this late afternoon. However, have two links to posts I loved reading:

Doctor Who:

LISTEN meta on last week's DW episode which puts it excellently in a larger Whovian context.

Scriptwriter and Director of Breaking Bad's OZYMANDIAS look back a year later.

(Which reminds me I was here in the Southern Tyrolian alps, too, when BB ended. Tempus fugit indeed. Also, the article mentions Rian Johnson is set to direct the Star Wars sequel after the next one, if I understand it correctly, which, um, does that mean I have to watch it? I am that oddity, more invested in the prequels than in the classic trilogy anyway and really not interested in what happened next. Then again: Rian Johnson did some fantastic work on Breaking Bad and I'm glad he'll get a cinematic break. Presumably he won't use lense flares, either. Hm.)
That was classic Moffat.

Fear is... )
selenak: (Not from Nottingham by Calapine)
( Sep. 7th, 2014 12:15 pm)
As Mark Gatiss episodes go, this was lightweight fun. I enjoyed myself.

Have you BEEN to Nottingham? )
In which there are good character stuff and gigantic plot holes.

Where is a continuity scriptgirl if the Moff needs one? )
You know the Companion of ages past Clara should now urgently meet? Peri, in her early days with the Sixth Doctor.

Read more... )
selenak: (Science Buddies by Mayoroftardtown)
( Aug. 22nd, 2014 11:05 am)
I won't be able to watch Peter Capaldi's first Doctor Who episode in real time, after all, and not for a considerable time after (read: Monday), but it's for a good rl cause. Meanwhile, there's multifandom fanfiction:

Marvelverse: Howard Stark usually shows up in one of two ways in MCU fanfiction - either as part of Tony's daddy issues, or, more rarely, in Captain America WWII era fanfiction in pretty much the same capacity as he did in the movie - flirting with Peggy (and/or Steve), but nothing series. This story, by contrast, takes the canon info of Howard having worked on the Manhattan Project and runs with it in this taut exploration of science and responsibility, dealing with history in a way very few Marvel stories do which usually go for window dressing. Short, but every sentence carries a punch. Like this one: He would ask Arnim Zola about it, once. About Poland. Once, and never again. Says it all about post WWII transfer of German scientists (though Zola, as he points out to Steve in the movies, is Swiss) to the US, and all the handwaving that entailed. Here's the story:


A particle, a wave (1068 words) by kvikindi
Chapters: 1/1
Fandom: Captain America (Movies), Marvel Cinematic Universe
Rating: Teen And Up Audiences
Warnings: Graphic Depictions Of Violence
Characters: Howard Stark
Additional Tags: Manhattan Project, References to Injury of a Child
Summary:

"My father helped defeat Nazis. He worked on the Manhattan Project."




Highlander: Even shorter - a drabble - but a great character piece about Rebecca and Amanda, and how to survive as an immortal:

those who shine brightest (100 words) by storiesfortravellers
Chapters: 1/1
Fandom: Highlander: The Series
Rating: Teen And Up Audiences
Warnings: No Archive Warnings Apply
Relationships: Amanda Darieux/Rebecca Horne
Characters: Rebecca Horne, Amanda Darieux
Additional Tags: Pre-Series, Training, Swordfighting, thieves, Mentor/Protégé, Drabble
Summary:

Amanda and Rebecca are practicing their fighting skills when Amanda finds out that Rebecca knows some of her secrets.

Because fannish life sometimes loves me, I've just found out that Bryan Cranston's stage performance as LBJ will be filmed for tv. Exceeeeeellent news for us overseas fans.

Due to the Big Finish offerings this last week, I've sampled a lot more audios. Among the most memorable ones:

Spare Parts (Fifth Doctor & Nyssa): one of the most famous ones, by Marc Platt; an origin tale for the Cybermen (original Mondas version) in the mode of Genesis of the Daleks (i.e. Doctor experiences critical point of development of already established antagonist, becomes involved with local population who have no idea of their fate). Most Five adventures I've listened to until now tended to be more optimistic than their tv counterparts, but this one has the Fifth Doctor in very familiar tv horrified-by-ghastly-goings-on-without-being-able-to-stop-them mode. Though on tv the Mondasians would have been less or not likeable at all, whereas here they are, which makes what happens to them extra tragic.

Protect and Survive (Seventh Doctor, Ace and Hex): part of the lead up to the events from Gods and Monsters and Afterlife, but also a self-contained story that really went under my skin. It was produced while Sylvester McCoy was busy filming The Hobbit, so it has minimal Doctor participation (though what there is of him is crucial, and it wouldn't work without that part), making a virtue of necessity. Ace and Hex are - due to circumstances that get gradually revealed to them and the audience - trapped in the most ghastly time loop possible. Because, like Ace, I was a teenager in the 1980s, the scenario in question, i.e. a nuclear war does happen and the survivors slowly die of radiation sickness, is intimately familiar. I don't think anyone who grew up after 1989 can understand how very real that possibility was and how it was part of your subconscious and your dreams/nightmares. Including the official info material of what to do just in case (and knowing that actually, these tips are pointless), which is used to great effect here. Mind you: this is not a "big" war story but a very intimate one - just four people (Ace, Hex, and two guest characters) plus the Doctor in absentia (he's missing at the start of the story, and only present in flashback in the third part, though that flashback not only explains what's been going on but packs the biggest emotional wallop re: the Doctor's terrifying side when dealing with enemies since I first saw what happened to the Family (of Blood) at the end of the episode of that name. It's one of the sharpest examinations of the ethics of such actions in Doctor Who, and yet also shows exactly why they happened. The acting by Sophie Aldred and Philip Olivier is top notch and makes you empathize with Ace and Hex to the nth degree.

Flip Flop (Seventh Doctor and Mel): this one is on one level very clever experimental storytelling - there are four "episodes" like on the usual Big Finish audio adventure, but they form two stories which can be listened to in any order because they're both self contained and completely interlocked, taking place at the same time on two parallel time streams. I have mixed feelings about it, though, not because the production doesn't pull it off - it does, and Bonnie Langford as Mel proves again that with a decent script she can be as good a companion as any -, but because the scenario in one of the two timelines is something that strikes me as an almost perfect fundamentalist right wing dream/nightmare scenario, and as such very ill fitting with Doctor Who (especially not with the Seventh Doctor era). The two different timelines hinge on the arrival of a slug-like species called the Slithegee at a human colony planet, where they occupy one of the moons and ask it should be given to them, since they're refugees. In one scenario, the President grants them the moon; in the other, spoilery stuff happens and an all out war with the Slithegee is the result. The paranoid right wing fantasy scenario is the first one, as the Slithegee proceed to take over the system, accusing any humans resisting the gradual take over of hate speech (that expression gets flung about a lot) and discrimination, and thirty years after their arrival own nine tenths of the planet while the humans live in ghettos, and Christmas is renamed Slimetide in the name of religious toleration etc. In short, it's the dystopia as prophecied by current right wing fanatic complaining of "political correctness gone mad", and the Slithegee are presented as uniformly revolting without any positive quality whatsoever, insisting on being the victims all the time while in actuality outnumbering and oppressing the humans. Just about the only thing which saves it from being anti-immigration propaganda is that the other timeline, where there was war with the Slithegee instead, is an equally dark dystopia, because there the Slithegee were defeated, but the planet became poisoned by the warfare, and the surviving humans have become a fascist dicatorship prone to commit massacres on each other.

Incidentally, while both scenarios are incredibly dark, the tone of the episodes isn't grimdark at all but more Blackadder like; lots of mistaken identity gambits and ridiculing of self important bureaucracies (both of the fascist humans and the Slithegee, depending on the timeline). It makes for a clash of tone and content that's sometimes effective and sometimes just plain weird. But really, the most disturbing thing is the feel of the Slithegee-Takeover-Timeline scenario. So: points of experimenting with the format and exploring the possibilities of time travel/fallout from altering history tropes in a very creative way, but I don't think I could bring myself to listen to it again.
selenak: (Triad by Etherealnetwork)
( Aug. 3rd, 2014 11:06 am)
I will get to watch the first Capaldi Doctor Who episode live after all, courtesy of [personal profile] trobadora. And since this puts me into a good mood to start my Sunday with, have some adorable Once upon a Time fluff (because all angst, all the time can be as boring as the reverse, and this is delightful and in character for everyone concerned - oh, and it's post s3, if you haven't watched it yet and want to remain absolutely spoiler free):

Tight-knit (2892 words) by kattahj
Chapters: 1/1
Fandom: Once Upon a Time (TV)
Rating: General Audiences
Warnings: No Archive Warnings Apply
Relationships: Captain Hook | Killian Jones/Emma Swan, Prince "Charming" James | David Nolan/Snow White | Mary Margaret Blanchard
Characters: Emma Swan, Prince "Charming" James | David Nolan, Snow White | Mary Margaret Blanchard, Captain Hook | Killian Jones, Henry Mills (Once Upon a Time)
Additional Tags: Knitting, Fluff, Family
Summary:

With the help of her family, Emma learns to knit. Or tries to...

selenak: (Cora by Uponyourshore)
( Jul. 27th, 2014 07:08 pm)
Still in haste and briefly:

Doctor Who:

Due to all the interest (and their server crashing), Big Finish is changing their 15 Days to 15 Offers, which each offer available for several days.

Make Mine Marvel:

Steve Rogers meta. Only connect, as Forster put it. And speaking of Steve, as you you can see in this bit from the Comic Con panel where the Avengers actors show up, Chris Evans got the most applause, which no one would have predicted a few years back. Methinks it was Cap 2 which made the difference.

Once Upon A Time:

Another SDCC goodie for those of us far, far away: The REAL reason why the writers decided to do that storyline in s4 which the s3 tag scene revealed. Read: a hilarious sketch in which the OuaT writing staff pokes fun at themselves. Complete with Jane Espenson's pizza fandom (known to the world since the audio commentary for Conversations with Dead People from BTVS was on dvd) and a cameo from a Dharma telephone from Lost. (The fact that some Lost alumni ended up in OuaT, others in Bates Motel and yet others in New Zealand doing Tolkien-Jackson stuff tells you all about what kind of a show Lost was. :)
selenak: (Ace by Kathyh)
( Jul. 26th, 2014 05:53 pm)
Darth Real Life is after me again, keeping me busy. I hear the first episode of Capaldi!Doctor is going to be shown in cinemas the way the big anniversary episode was, and while Munich is bound to be among the cinemas in question, I shan't be there on the 28th of August; I'll be in Bamberg with the Aged Parents and thus confined to the small screen experience, alas.

Listing to all the Seventh Doctor audios recently put me in the mood for the Doctor and Ace again, and so I'm glad a commenter pointed me towards a fantastic story in which the Eleventh Doctor and Ace have an adventure together: Dragons of the Mind. It's based on tv canon only, uses the bit we hear about Ace and the other former Companions in a certain Sarah Jane Adventures episode and presents a plausible version of an older Ace, who is more mature but still very much herself.

Moving over to X-Men: The Consequence of Faith is a lovely exploration of just what may have motivated Mystique to perform a Logan-related action near the end of the movie, and touches on her relationship with Charles, always one of my favourite things about the prequels.

And lastly, not a fanfic, but it might as well be: The email Tom Hiddleston wrote to Joss Whedon upon first reading the Avengers script. Damm it, Hiddleston. You will not draw me into your cult, no matter how adorable and enthusiastic you are. It. will. not. work. I shall resist by thinking of how you are to blame for the Loki woobification. But damm, you're making it haaaaaard!
...or if you've ever thought of trying out said audio plays but aren't exactly cash fluent, this may be of interest: Big Finish is celebrating their 15th anniversary, and every day for 15 days, they're putting different audio plays up to be downloaded (for 24 hours, then it changes) for just one pound. On day 1, there were even some free audio equivalent of short stories as well. Day 2, which should be soon over, includes some of the best Sixth Doctor audios (Jubilee by Rob Shearman later became, heavily altered because of the different Doctor and Companion, the episode Dalek on New Who; The Holy Terror is both a spoof of fantasy melodrama and an examination of real emotional horror once it sinks in what's actually going on - also, that's the one where the Companion looks like a Penguin).

Like I said: if you've been thinking about checking out the audios, this week and the next should be a great occasion to get several of them cheaply.
Much to do in the last few days, and despite not being a football (soccer for you Americans) fan per se, I wasn't immune to all the excitement, and yes, did watch us getting the World Cup. (You couldn't sleep that night anyway, being in Munich. The celebratory noise level was incredible.) However, I also went on a Seventh Doctor audio binge, which means some thoughts accumulated. Before I get to those, a completely unrelated link: Can we say Vergil wrote fanfiction?, smart meta involving fanfiction as a genre, Vergil and the Brothers Grimm.

Now, on to Doctor Who, audio department thoughts. Big Finish does both standalone adventures and story arcs, and I listened into two of the later plus a standalone for the Seventh Doctor. Now, for some years you had the tv team of the Doctor and Ace with the audio additon of Hex, aka Thomas Hector Schofield, nurse from Liverpool, as a Team TARDIS with a dynamic in their own right; then, at the climax of the audio Gods and Monsters, something shattering happened.

Which is spoilery, and thus behind a cut. )

One of the very early Big Finish adventures, Coldlitz, had the Doctor and Ace ending up in guess where; I still haven't listened to it because I tend to shy away from the idea of Doctor Who actually tackling the Third Reich in an unmetaphorical way (there are plenty of Space Nazis in the long history of the show, just like in most fantasy and sci fi shows). The dangers of tackiness, caricature or softening a real life horror just seemed to great. However, fannish osmosis told me that one of the villains in Coldlitz, Dr. Elizabeth Klein, who hails from a timeline where the Nazis did win WW II, ended up stranded in the "real" timeline at the end of the audio and was brought back more recently, years later, to serve as the least likely Companion ever. (Unless you count Shalka!Master, I suppose.) This made me curious enough to handwave another of my aversions, to wit: my problem with "Germany wins WWII and the Third Reich continues to rule the world" - just can't see it happen, not with Hitler on top - one reason why Stalin died in bed after decades of tyranny, undefeated, was that he knew to keep the killing within his own sphere of influence and didn't want to be seen as a world conqueror, but Hitler? never would have been satisfied with that even if you suppose technological MacGuffin X forces the Allies to go for a truce - , and not with all the infighting between his upper level paladins if you remove him from the equation. And the corruption within the party. And - anyway. Can't see it happening.

This handwaved, I was curious about Dr. Klein, how Big Finish would develop her, and what type of dynamic she would have with the Seventh Doctor. So off I went and acquired the Klein trilogy - "A Beating of Tiny Wings", "Survival of the Fittest" and "The Architects of History. This turned out to be a great decision. Nitpicks first, so I can get to why and how and praise: perfect, these stories aren't. Beating of Tiny Wings takes place during the Mau Mau Rising in Kenya, but is essentially a version of The Thing (of horror movie fame) put in its opposite surrounding, climate wise, and the Mau Mau Rising context is mostly there so there's a reason why various (white) women are trapped on a farm and can't know whether any new arrival is there to help them or kill them. At some point, it must have occured to someone in the storyediting department that if you set a story in Africa, there should maybe also be a black character. So there is one, but a) he's mostly there to make the point the British ladies (and British society in the 1950s) are racist, he gets no characterisation beyond that, minimal text and an unceremonious death. My other nitpick concerns The Architects of History: I just don't get why German characters other then Klein speak in one of those typical fake German accents when they're supposed to speak German (we're just hearing it as English because this is an English audio.) In fact, it was a HUUUUGE plot point in Survival of the Fittest that the TARDIS telepathic circuits translate whatever everyone speaks into whatever everyone else speaks for everyone. (Which is why at one point Klein mentions to the Doctor he has a stuffy Prussian accent; it cracks me up to no end that this is what the TARDIS found to equal the Scottish accent, let me tell you.) I mean, Doctor Who is just following the custom of the majority of film and tv there, and I wrote an entire entry years ago why I think fake accents (be they French, German, Spanish or whatever) when we're assuming the characters are in fact using their own language are ridiculous. I still think so, let's leave it at that.

Those were the nitpicks. Now for the good stuff. Elizabeth Klein turns out to be a great character. One of the things I was most curious about was whether or not the audios would go for a redemption story, especially since she wasn't a member of a fictional fascist organization with fictional victims, like, say, Aeryn Sun on Farscape; having real life victims still among us makes for a different emotional resonance. Speaking of real life, what happened in Germany post WWII was often referred to as "re-education", was aided by the Marshall Plan, and it wasn't until the 1960s - when the children of the WWII generation had grown up - that actual confrontation with the past happened not from outside but from inside on a massive scale. This, clearly, isn't something you can carry out in a series of audio adventures with one character.

Elizabeth Klein as the Doctor runs into her again in Kenya isn't repentant or in any way convinced she (and the ideology she was raised in) was wrong; moreover, as far she's concerned, her timeline was the right one, the current one is a travesty, and it's the Doctor's fault that she lost everyone who ever meant anything to her when her timeline blinked out of existence. However, she's also smart and wants to survive, so teaming up with the Doctor in the Thing-like situation in Kenya makes sense. That she's also a scientist who can talk to the Doctor on that level made me wonder whether the idea for Klein wasn't inspired by the Third Doctor tv story Inferno, where the Doctor temporarily experiences an alternate universe where Britain is fascist, his then companion Dr. Elizabeth Shaw is Section Leader Shaw, and the Brig is equally fascist. The start of the next audio, when we get Elizabeth Klein's backstory wherein she got recruited by the guy heading an alien artificats investigating organzation in a victorious Germany also argues for that. Anyway, one key difference to Inferno is that Three has no backstory with Section Leader Shaw and tries to win her over because he knows her alter ego. Whereas Seven and Klein have, in both senses of the word, history, which makes for mutual (deserved) distrust. This makes for great dialogue because Klein is far from stupid and thus not a ranting cliché, which means she and the Doctor keep their verbal digs at each other while working together on an equally successful rate instead of him effortlessly beating her in the verbal sparring. Also, Tracey Childs is fantastic in the role. (And thankfully not forced to fake a German accent.) When the Doctor at the end offers her a lift, it's an incredible gamble (because she still wants her original timeline back), but you can see the variety of motives on why he does it: not least continuing distrust and control issues (she's a lose element with a destructive ideology and superior technological knowledge in the 1950s), but also being intrigued by the challenge of her (she's clever and ruthless; what could she be if she does change?). And, as it turns out, a sense of responsibility, because it's due to him she's stranded in this timeline in more ways than one. He didn't just restore the original timeline in Coldlitz, no, as turns out at the start of Survival of the Fittest, where we get her backstory, he manipulated her into coming to Coldlitz to begin with, setting her up to give him the means to wipe out "her" universe.

This he did due to the series of events which created the victorious!Germany timeline to begin with; among other things, the Seventh Doctor regenerated into the Eighth not in San Francisco in a bad American movie but in Alt!Germany, though still after getting shot. Poor Eight. Or not so poor Eight, because as Johann Schmidt (hooray for a Paul McGann cameo), he then cons Elizabeth Klein who is trying to figure out how to operate the TARDIS into bringing it to 1944 to his previous self. One reason why the Doctor and Klein combination works is that this way, the dynamic isn't just "the hero and the Nazi". She does have a genuine non-petty reason to hate him because he used her to basically uncreate her entire world; at the same time, her timeline is bad news for so many people that of course one can't wish it restored. Survival of the Fittest sees the Doctor and Klein on a planet where the native population are basically intelligent giant bees called Vriil, who are in danger of getting wiped out by some greedy humans. I thought I knew where this was going: Klein would learn empathy by sympathizing with the endangered Vriil and see the error of her fascist ways. Perhaps this is what in story the Doctor expects to happen, too. But the writers go for something more complicated - and realistic - because while Klein does sympathize with the Vriil and shows compassion for them (aided by her disgust for the sloppy and creating-even-more-damage-than-intended-by-bumbling humans), this does not change her basic goals, chief among them the need to restore the to her real timeline, or her resentment of the Doctor. Which is why Survival of the Fittest ends with a breathtaking cliffhanger, and why Elizabeth Klein fulfills both the Companion and the Main Antagonist role in this trilogy, which I don't think is a dynamic we've ever seen before.

The Architects of History, in which basically every character doublecrosses everyone else at least once, sets itself the additional challenge to make the audience care about yet another alt!world and -characters in addition to the Klein-and-the-Doctor double act, and succeeds. It has Leonora Crichlow (Annie in Being Human; she also guest starred on New Who in Gridlock) as a Companion-who-never-was, and what happens with her in the course of the narrative contributes to the emotional punch. It's both a siege story and a "be careful what you wish for" story, and at no point does the narrative either excuse Klein or make her into a one dimensional villain whom the Doctor can easily (for both himself and the audience) dispose of; to avoid both extremes is truly an art, and this trilogy, including its climactic finale, pulls it off. And speaking of avoidance: Klein falling in love with the Doctor, let alone he with her, is also one easy way out that I don't think the current tv show could have resisted, and it never happens here. Go, Big Finish!

In conclusion: yes, I saw the latest trailer, and I'm looking forward to the show, but to be honest, the audios right now are what I'm truly fannish about as far as Doctor Who is concerned. They have my heart and mind.
Tags:
Five Times Jesse Pinkman Met A Companion (The Breaking Who Remix) (11021 words) by Selena
Chapters: 5/5
Fandom: Breaking Bad, Doctor Who & Related Fandoms, Torchwood, Doctor Who, Sarah Jane Adventures
Rating: Teen And Up Audiences
Warnings: No Archive Warnings Apply
Relationships: Jesse Pinkman & Walter White, Third Doctor & Alistair Gordon Lethbridge-Stewart, Tenth Doctor & Sarah Jane Smith, Lance Bennett & Donna Noble, Jesse Pinkman & Martha Jones, Jesse Pinkman & Donna Noble, Jesse Pinkman & Jack Harkness, Jesse Pinkman & Alistair Gordon Lethbridge-Stewart, Jesse Pinkman & Sarah Jane Smith, Luke Smith & Sarah Jane Smith, Rani Chandra & Sarah Jane Smith
Characters: Jesse Pinkman, Martha Jones, Donna Noble, Jack Harkness, Alistair Gordon Lethbridge-Stewart, Sarah Jane Smith, Walter White, Gwen Cooper, Rex Matheson, Esther Drummond, Third Doctor, Tenth Doctor, Luke Smith, Rani Chandra, Gita Chandra, Jilly Kitzinger, Skyler White
Additional Tags: Crossover
Summary:

Jesse Pinkman keeps running into past and future time travellers. Or they keep running into him. Sometimes they even bring the Doctor along.



Well, newish; this was my contribution to this year's and last month's remix ficathon, and one of my most ambitious crossovers.

The original story I picked to remix was a short piece in which Jesse Pinkman from Breaking Bad, a few years post show, moves into Sarah Jane Smith's (of Doctor Who and her own spin-off fame) neighbourhood. I liked the idea of Jesse Pinkman in the Whoverse, and of him encountering one of the Doctor Who Companions, precisely because at first glance the shows seem to be so utterly alien (no pun intended) to each other. (Though Jesse, as a canonical sci fi fan, might not think so.) However, the Jesse and Sarah Jane encounter, featuring a Jesse recovered from his ordeals and responsible for Brock and Lydia's daughter Kiira, could only be the conclusion, the happy ending, so to speak, and it had to be earned. What would get me there, though?

Which was when the idea of a "Five times" format and Jesse meeting not one, but five Companions hit me. A few months earlier, I had idly speculated about Companions from other fandoms and Jesse ending up with the Third Doctor (both because he's conditioned to respond to authoritative middle-aged men with a chip on their shoulder taking an interest, and because of the Brig's expression when meeting Jesse), so I knew one of the candidates had to be the Brigadier. I also wanted to avoid the fallacy of blaming all of Jesse's miseries on Walt; Jesse was into drugs (both taking and selling) before ever becoming Walt's partner, and he made decisions at various key points that contributed to damaging others and weren't due to Walt's manipulations. Therefore, one of the Companions, I decided, was going to be Donna Noble, meeting early s3 nihilistic I'-m-evil-so-there Jesse. Few people are as good for cutting-through-crap as Donna, and on her end, it gave me the chance to explore her dealing with her Lance issues.

To balance Donna, and to do justice to the inspiration-to-do-better aspect of the Whoverse, I decided to let one of the segments be about meeting Martha; given the Year-that-Wasn't where Martha walks the earth inspiring people is a canon AU, this was the ideal time frame. Speaking of time: the Whoverse with its timey-wimeyness practically asked for the encounters not to be told in chronological order. However, the darkest one was always going to be the middle. Now there is one season of Torchwood that's conveniently set in the US - the most unpopular one, Torchwood: Miracle Day -, and its basic premise allowed me to follow the Breaking Bad principle of wondering "what WORSE thing could happen to the characters now?" about the BB finale, Felina. The answer being: Felina takes place on Miracle Day, which means nobody who dies in said finale actually stays dead. Talk about adding injury to insult. The fallout of this means post Felina Jesse encounters Captain Jack Harkness, and this is also the segment where I got to explore both Jesse's feelings about Walt and Jack's continued dealings with Children of Earth somewhat.

I did wonder, once I'd finished it, whether there'd be many people interested in both Breaking Bad and Doctor Who who'd be likely to read the story. But I couldn't not write it. It practically wrote itself, once I got going, and I am immensely proud of it.

The rest of the days )
selenak: Made by <lj user="shadadukal"> (James Bond)
( Jun. 3rd, 2014 01:45 pm)
First, spotted while surfing around, a meme:

Who is your Doctor? Don't have a single one. It definitely isn't my first, because the first Doctor I ever saw was Tom Baker, whom younger me did not take to at all. Later, I became in varying degrees fond of most regenerations (still not keen on Four, though, but he has the majority of fandom to love him best, he doesn't need me). Which of them I prefer above the rest really depends on a) the mood I'm in and b) the medium (because, say, Six is so ill served on tv, and he certainly isn't a favourite there, but on audio Colin Baker rules, and so these days when I think of the Sixth Doctor I think of him in his audio incarnation).

Who is your Doctor's companion? Donna Noble. With close runner ups Ace and Jo for Old Who and Evelyn Smythe from the audios, but really, DONNA.

Who is your Batman? Michael Keaton. Though Christian Bale in "Batman Begins" is my Bruce Wayne. It's just that too much of the Nolan films ultimately ticks me off that has to do with the Batman worship.

Who is your Cat Woman? Anne Hathaway, wowing all naysayers and by far the best thing in the awful third Nolan movie.

Who is your Sherlock Holmes? Jeremy Brett, no question about it. If I'm limited to more recent incarnations, it's Johnny Lee Miller.

Who is your fictional female federal agent? (eg, Dana Scully, Audrey Parker, Olivia Dunham, etc) : Oh, how I loved Clarice Starling in Silence of the Lambs. Then Hannibal happened. While I like all the tv ladies named as examples, I have to change agencies to answer the question for ongoing love, because: Sydney Bristow. Who is one of those characters who aren't my favourites, nor are they the ones immediately winning me over, but they are firm secondary loves and my affection never waves. And much as I have issues with the fifth Alias season on behalf of my favourites, I thought it did well with Sydney herself and gave her a good send-off. Encapsulated in the moment when Irina says you can't be a mother and a good spy, and Sydney replies "watch me".

If we also include comics, and again, branch out in agencies, then it's Agent Abigail Brand of SWORD.

Who is your Robin Hood? The fox one from the Disney movie. I imprinted on him! Runner-up: Sean Connery in Robin and Marian for autumnal grace and wit. (Well,the script is by James "Lion in Winter" Goldman.)

Who is your Maid Marian/Marion? Audrey Hepburn in Robin and Marian, definitely. See above, re: autumnal grace and wit.

Who is your Bond? Daniel Craig from his first outing onwards. Judi Dench is, of course, my M. But not until Craig came along did she have a Bond worthy of her. *verily, my Brosnan dislike runs deep*

Who is your fictional female assassin? (eg, Natasha Romanov, various incarnations of Nikita, etc): Natasha. Especially in her MCU incarnation. Tied with Mystique (definitely her cinematic incarnation).

And speaking of the X-verse, have another rec:

Running for Cover (3094 words) by RemoCon
Chapters: 1/1
Fandom: X-Men (Movies), X-Men: Days of Future Past (2014)
Rating: Not Rated
Warnings: Author Chose Not To Use Archive Warnings
Relationships: Erik Lehnsherr/Charles Xavier
Characters: Peter Maximoff, Charles Xavier, Erik Lehnsherr, Hank McCoy, Alex Summers, Kurt Wagner, Raven | Mystique
Summary:

Peter wasn't really looking for more family.

Aaaand it's time for the remix reveal. I wrote:


Five Times Jesse Pinkman Met A Companion (The Breaking Who Remix) (11021 words) by Selena
Chapters: 5/5
Fandom: Breaking Bad, Doctor Who & Related Fandoms, Torchwood, Doctor Who, Sarah Jane Adventures
Rating: Teen And Up Audiences
Warnings: No Archive Warnings Apply
Relationships: Jesse Pinkman & Walter White, Third Doctor & Alistair Gordon Lethbridge-Stewart, Tenth Doctor & Sarah Jane Smith, Lance Bennett & Donna Noble, Jesse Pinkman & Martha Jones, Jesse Pinkman & Donna Noble, Jesse Pinkman & Jack Harkness, Jesse Pinkman & Alistair Gordon Lethbridge-Stewart, Jesse Pinkman & Sarah Jane Smith, Luke Smith & Sarah Jane Smith, Rani Chandra & Sarah Jane Smith
Characters: Jesse Pinkman, Martha Jones, Donna Noble, Jack Harkness, Alistair Gordon Lethbridge-Stewart, Sarah Jane Smith, Walter White, Gwen Cooper, Rex Matheson, Esther Drummond, Third Doctor, Tenth Doctor, Luke Smith, Rani Chandra, Gita Chandra, Jilly Kitzinger, Skyler White
Additional Tags: Crossover
Summary:

Jesse Pinkman keeps running into past and future time travellers. Or they keep running into him. Sometimes they even bring the Doctor along.



Which brought together two of my favourite fictional universes in a mad love declaration for both.

And I also wrote a tiny little thing for Remix Madness:

First Woman of Rome (The Claudian Remix) (506 words) by Selena
Chapters: 1/1
Fandom: Rome, Historical RPF, I Claudius, Ancient History RPF
Rating: General Audiences
Warnings: Author Chose Not To Use Archive Warnings
Relationships: Livia Drusilla & Atia of the Julii
Characters: Atia of the Julii, Livia Drusilla
Summary:

There is more than one way to win. Livia doesn't need to attack Atia in order to destroy her.

.

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