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([personal profile] weasleytook posting in [community profile] crossovering Sep. 29th, 2016 11:30 pm)
There are just about 24 hours left to post your stories before our deadline of 12 a.m. PDT on September 30. (what time is that for me?) You will have plenty of time between that deadline and when the collection opens to the public to edit your stories for spelling/grammar, but you must have a complete story, over 1000 words and with a beginning, middle and end by the date above.

Also, there will likely be pinch hits coming soon and the deadline for all pinch hits from this point forward will be October 7.

And now, the usual links: 

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Posted by Jen Neale

TORONTO, ON - SEPTEMBER 29: Team Canada celebrates their World Cup Championship over Team Europe during Game Two of the World Cup of Hockey final series at the Air Canada Centre on September 29, 2016 in Toronto, Canada. Team Canada defeated Team Europe 2-1. (Photo by Chris Tanouye/Getty Images)
TORONTO, ON – SEPTEMBER 29: Team Canada celebrates their World Cup Championship over Team Europe during Game Two of the World Cup of Hockey final series at the Air Canada Centre on September 29, 2016 in Toronto, Canada. Team Canada defeated Team Europe 2-1. (Photo by Chris Tanouye/Getty Images)

Pretty much everyone except Team Europe was settled on the fact that Team Canada was going to win the first World Cup of Hockey since 2004.

The question was then: how would they celebrate?

This isn’t the Stanley Cup. Nor is it winning a gold medal at the Olympics, or even winning a gold at the World Champions for that matter. Let’s get real, this is an NHL tournament to make some extra cash; not a major milestone.

But still, they won and DEM BOYZ from Canada got to celebrate their way with polite handshakes, one armed hugs and high fives.

First, game the shedding of the gear. Usually you see gloves, sticks and helmets to flying in the final seconds of Stanley Cup clinching game. Tonight, they shook off equipment as they skated over to Carey Price or before they left the bench.

Sidney Crosby was named the tournament MVP. He didn’t receive a mini trophy or something new. He got a clear plaque, reminiscent of those you’d see in middle-management offices for ‘Best Regional Manager by Pound of Paper Sold in Scranton.’

TORONTO, ON - SEPTEMBER 29: Bill Daly presents Sidney Crosby #87 of Team Canada with the World Cup of Hockey Championship MVP trophy after his teams win over Team Europe during Game Two of the World Cup of Hockey final series at the Air Canada Centre on September 29, 2016 in Toronto, Canada. The Team Canada defeated Team Europe 2-1. (Photo by Bruce Bennett/Getty Images)
TORONTO, ON – SEPTEMBER 29: Bill Daly presents Sidney Crosby #87 of Team Canada with the World Cup of Hockey Championship MVP trophy after his teams win over Team Europe during Game Two of the World Cup of Hockey final series at the Air Canada Centre on September 29, 2016 in Toronto, Canada. The Team Canada defeated Team Europe 2-1. (Photo by Bruce Bennett/Getty Images)

You can barely see it against Crosby’s jersey. We don’t know the backstory behind the ‘trophy,’ but we can only assume they carved it out of Superman’s Fortress of Solitude.

Then came the big moment- the World Cup of Hockey Trophy.

As captain, Sid got to hoist the Frank Gehry designed silver tampon encased in clear plastic trophy. He skated it around for a hot second before handing it off to Joe Thornton. It was less emotional than him handing the Cup to Trevor Daley, and a bit more like, ‘I don’t know what else to do with this.’

(Reports that the trophy has trapped John Tavares inside of it for all eternity are unconfirmed.)

TORONTO, ON - SEPTEMBER 29: Mike Babcock head coach of Team Canada carries the trophy as John Tavares #20 reflection is seen after their win over Team Europe during Game Two of the World Cup of Hockey final series at the Air Canada Centre on September 29, 2016 in Toronto, Canada. Team Canada defeated Team Europe 2-1. (Photo by Peter Power/Getty Images)
TORONTO, ON – SEPTEMBER 29: Mike Babcock head coach of Team Canada carries the trophy as John Tavares #20 reflection is seen after their win over Team Europe during Game Two of the World Cup of Hockey final series at the Air Canada Centre on September 29, 2016 in Toronto, Canada. Team Canada defeated Team Europe 2-1. (Photo by Peter Power/Getty Images)

After every player had his skate with the ugly vase from your great aunt chalice, they went to celebrate with the booze!

Donning goggles, these Canadian boys were ready to part like it was … high school?

They look a bit sheepish, no? Like Mike Babcock is going to come in and smack the beers out of their hands.

Well, Babs did come in and he did something that just doesn’t seem hygienic with this trophy. He drank beer out of it.

The Canadians will paint Toronto red for one last time before going back to their respective team training camps.

Let us leave you with one lasting memory of the Canadian’s win at the World Cup of Hockey. The raising of the flag and the special rendition of the national anthem.

– – – – – – –

Jen Neale is an editor for Puck Daddy on Yahoo Sports. Have a tip? Email her at puckdaddyblog@yahoo.com or follow her on Twitter!

Posted by Sean Leahy

GettyImages-611481460
Getty Images

TORONTO – They gathered in Quebec City in early September as 23 players representing eight countries from 21 different NHL clubs. They leave Toronto as a team that surprised everyone in the 2016 World Cup of Hockey.

Team Europe’s World Cup dreams fell apart in a span of 129 seconds late in the third period of Game 2 of the final against Canada. An Anze Kopitar penalty led to a Patrice Bergeron power-play goal, igniting a very, very red Air Canada Centre crowd. Ralph Krueger’s squad still had a chance with a late power-play opportunity, but their hopes for a dramatic finish in their favor was dashed when Jonathan Toews found a streaking Brad Marchand for the eventual shorthanded winner.

“Heartbreaking. It’s a very, very tough loss,” said Team Europe defenseman Mark Streit. “It’s tough to find the right words right now.”

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Mats Zuccarello said before Game 2 that they needed to play a “perfect game” in order to force a do-or-die Game 3. Team Europe gave Canada trouble all night, and even managed to grab a first-period lead, one it would hold until Bergeron’s tying goal.

Canada had only trailed for 2:41 the entire tournament; and behind Jaroslav Halak, Team Europe threatened to ensure there would be more hockey Saturday night.

“I thought we played a really good game again,” said Team Europe captain Anze Kopitar. “I thought we had some good chances to take the two-goal lead but we just couldn’t do it and the last few minutes, it just happened the way it happened. Obviously very disappointing, but I still think we left everything on the table. I’m really proud of this team because everybody pretty much thought we’d be the laughing joke of this tournament. The way we came together and played and made it to the final, I think we gave Canada a pretty good run for it. Unfortunately we just came up a little bit short.”

No one knew what to make of this Team Europe squad before the tournament. In a group with Canada, the U.S. and the Czech Republic, it was hard to fathom this team of thrown together hockey players from eight nations gelling quickly and advancing to the semifinals. Their first two pre-tournament games against the U-23 Team North America side didn’t provide any inspiration for that thought following losses of 4-0 and 7-4.

Embarrassing as they were, those losses, coupled with the six days before their first group game with the Americans, provided beneficial time for chemistry to develop.

“It [was] really tough to know what the expectations were. I didn’t know what to expect when we came together,” said defenseman Dennis Seidenberg. “We obviously had good names, and guys that came had a lot of hurdles to get to where they are and a lot of them won. We did have character on that team, but what was going to actually happen in the tournament was tough to know.”

The journey was a long, unexpected one, but one that the Team Europe players, even in this moment of pain, can appreciate. There was a sense of pride in that dressing room representing those eight countries against the world.

“We’ve talked about this all along. We were the Team Europe, but in some way we were representing our countries. We had our flags on our shoulder,” Kopitar said. “I think everybody was really excited to be here, and [while] you’re not playing for your home country … you’re playing for a bigger picture, which is very exciting too, just to be on this team and make the team. We were very invested in it, as I’m sure you guys saw too. We had a lot of fun. It was a special group and it’s one thing that I am for certain this is going to stay with us for a long, long time.”

No matter your thoughts on this incarnation of the World Cup of Hockey, Team Europe’s players cared and wanted to win. The experience wasn’t going to be a two-week vacation as Streit noted afterward, and coming up short in the final will stick with them for some time.

“This is gonna hurt for a while because we’re all hockey players,” Streit said, “we all wanna win hockey games. Losing like that, that hurts a lot.”

***

The World Cup experience did a lot for the members Team Europe. Dennis Seidenberg’s play helped earn him a one-year deal with the New York Islanders, and we’ll what happens with unrestricted free agent Christian Ehrhoff in the coming days.

But the biggest winner is head coach Ralph Krueger, the hockey man turned soccer executive.

Following his dismissal from the Edmonton Oilers after the lockout-shortened 2013 NHL season, he was appointed chairman of Southampton F.C. of the English Premier League.

Now after nearly guiding Team Europe to a hockey upset, his name will now be out there when the first head coach gets fired in the NHL this season. There’s already speculation that the Las Vegas expansion franchise should hire him when they join the league for the 2017-18 season. Krueger said after Game 2 that he’s committed to Southampton “now and in the near future,” but as a hockey lifer, you’d have to think if the right opportunity came along he’d be back behind a bench very quickly.

Krueger isn’t just a hockey coach or a soccer executive. He’s also an author, having written a motivational book in 2002. The tactics he laid out in those pages were certainly used over the last month in inspiring his thrown-together Team Europe squad.

Maybe another book comes out of this experience for Krueger, despite the final chapter coming out not exactly the way he wanted it to finish.

“It deserves a special story, just on the honesty of the game of hockey,” Krueger said. “I think that Team Europe proved tonight that if a group commits to playing connected and working for each other, with and without the puck, they can play against teams that are much more on paper skilled or have a higher value with them.

“[With] the whole story and the journey we took, the adversity we had and how we grew out of it and the permanent challenges we went through here in the tournament and we were able to overcome,” he said, “maybe this pain at the end makes it a better ending.”

– – – – – – –

Sean Leahy is the associate editor for Puck Daddy on Yahoo Sports. Have a tip? Email him at puckdaddyblog@yahoo.com or follow him on Twitter!

Posted by Josh Cooper

TORONTO, ON - SEPTEMBER 29: Brad Marchand #63 of Team Canada carries the World Cup of Hockey Trophy after Canada defeated Europe 2-1 during Game Two of the World Cup of Hockey final series at the Air Canada Centre on September 29, 2016 in Toronto, Canada. (Photo by Bruce Bennett/Getty Images)
Brad Marchand of Team Canada carries the World Cup of Hockey Trophy after Canada defeated Europe 2-1 during Game Two of the World Cup of Hockey final series at the Air Canada Centre on September 29, 2016 in Toronto, Canada. (Getty Images)

TORONTO – At the World Cup pre-tournament games for Team Canada in Ottawa, Brad Marchand was booed. He was also booed when the team got to Toronto for the start of the event.

It didn’t matter to the local fans that Marchand wasn’t on the hated Boston Bruins for this event and actually playing for their Team Canada. They still wanted to let Marchand know their displeasure for him.

But when Marchand gripped his hands around the World Cup trophy to lift it over his head, all of the Canadian fans in the Air Canada Centre cheered loudly for the 5-foot-9, 181-pound Halifax native.

“To be on a team like this and to have success and to win with a team like this, it’s an incredible feeling,” Marchand said. “I think all of Canada gets behind that and they all feel the enjoyment of that, feel the success of that and we all enjoy it together. It’s not just our team but all of Canada will be celebrating tonight.”

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This capped two of the most memorable hockey playing weeks of Marchand’s life. He got to play wing on a line with Sidney Crosby, received a new eight-year contract extension with the Boston Bruins and scored the World Cup game-winner shorthanded to give the Canadians a 2-1 last minute victory.

“I think the whole thing has been a bit of a whirlwind,” Marchand said. “When you come into a tournament like this you’re just trying to take everything in. This is the biggest stage in the world right now and to be a part of it is an incredible honor. And then to be put on a line with Sid and (Patrice Bergeron) is another big honor and there’s a lot of pressure that goes with that but it has been an incredible experience. Every day with the guys in the room and off the ice and like Sid said, the things we had to overcome. It has been a dream come true and I’ll cherish every second of this for the rest of my life.”

The World Cup showed off Marchand’s transformation that started last season from the agitating pest that President Barack Obama once referred to as a “little ball of hate” to high-end goal scorer. Marchand notched 37 goals for the Bruins and was named to Team Canada’s roster. But even after 2015-16 it didn’t appear Marchand would ride shotgun on one of the most coveted wing spots in the tournament with Crosby.

When Canada started training camp, Marchand was with Crosby and Bergeron and the trio stuck together throughout the tournament. Crosby and Bergeron had played together before internationally and knew each other’s games pretty well at this level. Marchand was more of a wild card – but quickly he clicked with the two centers and became the group’s designated sniper with a tournament leading five goals.

“I think we came into camp and it seemed to gel right away. And
definitely when you can get a good start, it builds confidence, and that’s a  big  part of it,” Crosby said. “So we were able to get a good start there in the first game. Yeah, sometimes it works, sometimes it doesn’t, and you have to juggle. I thought right from the start it felt like we were able to generate  a lot, and it’s fun to share this with them. Being from the same area (with Marchand in Nova Scotia), never really having a chance to play together, and then to play together  on  this  kind  of a stage, playing for your country, it’s pretty special.”

Marchand’s game-tying goal in the semifinal quickly erased Russia’s one-goal lead and set up Canada for a dominant third period. His goal Thursday in Game 2 of the final capped a furious comeback by Canada where they were down 1-0 until Bergeron tied the game with 2:53 left.

This set the stage for Marchand to trailed the play up ice shorthanded and bury a feed from Jonathan Toews past Jaroslav Halak for the game-winner with 43.1 seconds left.

“(Toews) made a great play to open up a lot of space and I just wanted to get a shot on net and luckily the puck went in the net,” he said.

Marchand has been able to become an elite goal scorer without sacrificing the identity that got him to this point. All tournament he still played with the same agitating way that’s his calling card. After this World Cup, Marchand appears poised to continue scoring goals at that elite level, and maybe even at a more prolific rate based on how he played this tournament.

At very least he arrived on a national stage for his offensive talent and that alone.

“Well obviously it’s special for him and his family and the opportunity he had here,” Canada coach Mike Babcock said. “Let’s not kid ourselves, he’s still a pest. He’s going to be a pest when we play in our home opener, he’ll be a pest. But he’s a pest with elite speed, elite skill and a good penalty killer.”

Added Babcock, ” These  are  things  you  remember  forever. (He’s) a Cup winner, he’s won a World  Championship,  and he’s won a World Cup. He keeps playing good, and if they keep the Olympics alive, he’ll have a chance there.”

– – – – – – –

Josh Cooper is an editor for Puck Daddy on Yahoo Sports. Have a tip? Email him at puckdaddyblog@yahoo.com or follow him on Twitter!

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Posted by Greg Wyshynski

Carey Price #31 of Team Canada celebrates in the locker room during Game Two of the World Cup of Hockey final series. (Andre Ringuette/Getty Images)
Carey Price #31 of Team Canada celebrates in the locker room during Game Two of the World Cup of Hockey final series. (Andre Ringuette/Getty Images)

TORONTO – Carey Price sat at the podium with plastic eye protectors strapped around his head, ones that kept the spray of Canadian champagne (i.e. bottles of Molson) from his eyes in his team’s championship locker room celebration.

“Team-issued,” said Price.

Canada had won the World Cup of Hockey in thrilling fashion, completing the tournament 6-0 and dispatching Team Europe in a two-game sweep in the final round.

But that’s the thing about beer goggles: They make it all look better that it actually is.

Outside of the last three minutes of the game, Canada was outplayed, out-hustled and outperformed by Team Europe. At best they looked disjointed, at worst they looked like a stubborn opponent was controlling them.

“They were playing a really stingy game, denying the middle, not letting us play with the speed that we wanted to play. It was working to their advantage,” said center Patrice Bergeron, whose power-play goal late in the third tied the game and sparked the Canadian rally that would win it.

So for 57 minutes, it was on Carey Price to ensure that Canada would be in position to potentially tie the game with his 32-save effort. Just like it was on Price to bail out Canada in their sloppy first game of the final, with an identical 32-save effort.

“They played tight, they played structured, and they played fast. They made it difficult, that’s for sure,” said Price.

Sidney Crosby was rightfully named the MVP of the tournament. But Price was their most valuable player in the two wins that clinched it.

“Pricer played a heck of a game, just like he did a few days ago,” said Jonathan Toews, who assisted in Brad Marchand’s short-handed game-winning goal with 44 seconds left. “Sometimes it comes down to goaltending. Their goaltender played a hell of a game, too, but Carey was there when we needed him.”

Team Europe coach Ralph Krueger echoed the sentiments.

“We took a lot of risks in this game, and Carey Price was, once again, just amazing. You have to say that Jaroslav Halak played a hell of a game, but at the end, [Price] made some outstanding saves,” he said.

There was perhaps none better than his save on Marian Hossa with 1:09 left in the game, the score tied 1-1 and Europe on the power play. “Pricey made a hell of a save It’s unbelievable, but he just does what he does,” said coach Mike Babcock.

It was a rocket off the stick of one of the NHL’s best snipers. Price snagged it, and the Canada fans in the stands when bonkers.

“Just a quick play,” said Price. “I just tried to make myself big [in the net] and squeezed it.”

Brad Marchand said it was a turning point, kicking Canada’s rally up a notch.

“You see the emotion in the whole arena when he made that save. I think everyone, especially after the goal, was unbelievable, very electric. And when he made that save, they kind of brought it to another level. And we feed off of that energy, there’s no question about that,” said Marchand, who scored the short-handed game winner 25 seconds later.

“You could tell the boys were confident, and you definitely want to help him out when he makes a save like that. You’ve got to play your part, too, and fortunately we were able to return the favor.”

GettyImages-611480980

For Price, the win added another championship to his collection: Olympic gold in Sochi 2014 and world junior gold in Sweden back in 2007. He had a 16-game winning streak with Canadian national teams, and has allowed 17 goals in that span.

“Everybody’s bought it up, yeah. I thought it might be over tonight, but we willed our way through it,” he said.

The World Cup of Hockey, of course, was Price’s return to the ice after suffering a medial collateral ligament injury (MCL sprain) to his right knee in Nov. 2015, which ended his season with the Montreal Canadiens.

He’s answered questions about that journey back many times during the tournament, about how physically he felt good but that the tournament helped him get back into the game mentally.

On Thursday night, when asked about it again, he said tersely: “I’ve already covered this many times.”

The World Cup is over. Carey Price and his team are its rightful owners. Now, the goalie is ready to get back to the challenge of leading the Canadiens back to the playoffs.

Well, after the celebration ends.

“I might wear them all night,” said Price of his beer goggles.


Greg Wyshynski is a writer for Yahoo Sports. Contact him at puckdaddyblog@yahoo.com or find him on Twitter. His book, TAKE YOUR EYE OFF THE PUCK, is available on Amazon and wherever books are sold.

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karzilla: a green fist above the word SMASH! (Default)
([staff profile] karzilla posting in [site community profile] dw_docs Sep. 29th, 2016 11:43 pm)

Hello, good people of docs! I come to you today bearing tidings of a new feature that is scheduled to go live on the site in the next few days. It is called Selective Screening and there's a post up in [site community profile] dw_dev describing how it works.

In order to explain this new functionality to our users, I believe a new FAQ is needed, with a title like "What is Selective Screening?" that explains what it does and how to use it. It doesn't have to be anything major; something similar to FAQ 58 would be quite sufficient.

I believe the following FAQs should also be updated to mention the feature and/or link to the new FAQ:

  • FAQ 9: How do I control who can comment on my journal?

  • FAQ 59: What can I do about unwanted comments?

  • FAQ 120: What are Dreamwidth's new features?

Thank you for your help!

kareila: "Mom, I'm hungry." "Hush, I'm coding. You ate yesterday." (coding)
([personal profile] kareila posting in [site community profile] dw_dev Sep. 29th, 2016 11:52 pm)
I've just merged [personal profile] woggy's code for the new Selective Screening feature! I'm planning on making it live on the site in the next couple of days, but in the meantime, I encourage you to test it in your development environment and let me know if you have any feedback. Here is how it works:

There are three console commands that govern who is subject to selective screening in your journal or community. They are screen_set, screen_unset, and screen_list and they are very similar to the related console commands for banning users. The maximum number of users you are allowed to apply selective screening to is 500 per journal/community.

When a user is subject to selective screening, all of that user's comments in the affected journal/community will be automatically screened, regardless of what the entry's screening settings are. The affected user is informed that their comments are being screened when viewing the reply form. The user's screened comments are like any other screened comments and can be manually unscreened, receive screened replies, etc.

This feature was requested back in 2012 and I am excited that it has been implemented!
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([personal profile] staranise Sep. 29th, 2016 10:56 pm)
Current book: The Spirit Catches You and You Fall Down: A Hmong Child, Her American Doctors, and the Collision of Two Cultures by Anne Fadiman. Interesting reading because it's so very much where I live, especially at a shelter helping immigrant women whose stories I only hear in the most fleeting detail. It's about a refugee family whose "medical noncompliance" for their daughter's epilepsy left medical professionals baffled, enraged, and exhausted; even years later, the professionals Fadiman talked to could recall this case in particular in exquisite detail, their love and concern for the little girl and their very mixed feelings about her family. The chapters of the book alternate Lia Lee's case history with essays on Hmong culture and history and the Lee family's place within them. The latter aren't approached from the modern lens of trauma research--which makes sense, since the book was written 1992-1997 and it's still an emerging field, especially so far as the medical and cognitive effects of trauma are concerned--but it's a lot of food for thought once I put those glasses on.

It reminds me that when I was providing a lot of therapy to a lot of different clients (& may those days return soon!) some of the most useful questions I could bring to bear were, "Why do you think you're having these problems?", "What do you think will help solve them?" and "How do you imagine this therapy will help you?"

In other words, the cats are getting along even more. Yesterday Emily came upstairs to explore the cousins' apartment, which she does from time to time, and she and Isobel sniffed nose-to-nose before Emily so much as growled; today she came upstairs, didn't growl at Izzy once, and was very reluctant to leave when I came downstairs. Then Gallagher came into my apartment--my brother Pat has moved upstairs into Mom's spare room, and the external door is through his bedroom, so after he goes to bed around 9pm I leave my door open so Izzy and Gally can come through my kitchen to be let into the foyer, thence to go through Mom's internal door--and spent some time wandering the apartment, and although Emmy moved around in stalking-mode to keep a very sharp eye on him, she offered him no actual hostilities.

Work on the bathroom floor continues slow and imperfect, but ultimately satisfying. Here's a picture.
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([personal profile] sailorptah Sep. 29th, 2016 11:36 pm)
Hello, prospective future Yuletide writer! Thank you in advance for the fic you are about to embark on. Here's a bunch of information to make it as easy as possible.

Oz books, Home, Fake News )

Posted by Jen Neale

at the semifinal game during the World Cup of Hockey tournament at the Air Canada Centre on September 25, 2016 in Toronto, Canada.
at the semifinal game during the World Cup of Hockey tournament at the Air Canada Centre on September 25, 2016 in Toronto, Canada.

After sustaining a foot injury in the semifinal round, Team Europe forward Marian Gaborik hobbled away from the World Cup of Hockey on crutches.

His injury is bad to the point it will keep him out at least eight weeks for the Los Angeles Kings. It also meant he would miss the final series against Team Canada. Perhaps that left him a bit surley.

Gaborik went from hockey player to hockey-fan-spitting-hawt-taeks Twitter in Game 2 of the final.

Like all puck heads, it starts positive.

It starts to go downhill on a disagreement over a call by the referees.

For Gaborik, it’s when Marian Hossa gets in on a breakaway and Brent Burns pokes and slashes at his hands.

Here’s the play via Steph:

And Gaborik’s reaction on Twitter:

Burns did receive a hooking penalty on the play, but Hossa was not awarded the penalty shot.

On to the final period. Corey Perry draws a holding penalty on Lady Byng winner (and perennial nominee) Anze Kopitar with 3:35 to go.

Gaborik turned to the next stage of Twitter hockey fandom – conspiracy theories.

@MGaborik12
@MGaborik12

(Look at who replied to him. That’s the verified Twitter account for Brandon Prust. His theory was pretty much correct…)

The Canadians came back to win the game.

As many good hockey fans (who just lost) on Twitter do, they give props to their team and throw some shade to those who they felt caused the loss.

– – – – – – –

Jen Neale is an editor for Puck Daddy on Yahoo Sports. Have a tip? Email her at puckdaddyblog@yahoo.com or follow her on Twitter!

Posted by Greg Wyshynski

Getty Images

TORONTO – Brad Marchand’s short-handed goal with 44 seconds remaining in Game 2 of the World Cup of Hockey final gave Canada the tournament championship, the result of a stunning third-period rally against Team Europe on Thursday night.

The host team finished the tournament 6-0, overcoming the toughest opponent they faced and the tightest game they played in the two-week NHL event.

Carey Price made 32 saves. Sidney Crosby was named tournament MVP, as its leading scorer.

In Game 1 of the World Cup of Hockey final, Canada showed how it could win ugly. In Game 2, they nearly showed they could lose that way, too, playing a disjointed and sloppy game.

Until the last three minutes, that is.

With Europe leading 1-0, captain Anze Kopitar was called for holding 16:25, a questionable call. After building pressure in the Europe zone, defenseman Brent Burns fired a shot from the blue line that center Patrice Bergeron deflected home from the slot for his fourth goal of the tournament.

Canada had never trailed in the third period in any of their games.

With the score now tied, defenseman Drew Doughty went to the box for a high-sticking call, and Europe had its own shot on the power play. One shot in particular: Marian Hossa’s rifle blast that nearly beat Price, but he made the save.

And then it was time for Marchand’s shorthanded heroics, and the World Cup was Canada’s.

Jonathan Toews entered the zone on an odd-man rush with Jay Bouwmeester. Suddenly, Marchand rushed in as the trailer, finding space between four Europe players to take a backhand pass from Toews and fire the puck past Jaroslav Halak (32 saves).

Then, 44 seconds later, Canada flooded the ice for a wild celebration.

Zdeno Chara got Team Europe on the board first with his second goal of the tournament.

Andrej Sekera skated into the zone and had Tobias Rieder going to the net with Drew Doughty. Canada’s Ryan Getzlaf slid over and attempted to help on defense, but that allowed Chara to slip in down the wing. Sekera slid a pretty pass across the zone, and Chara snapped the puck over the glove of Carey Price to the far top corner for the 1-0 lead at 6:26.

The Canadians caught a break later in the period on a breakaway from Marian Hossa, as Brent Burns was called for a hook rather than Hossa receiving a penalty shot. It was close.

Europe outshot Canada 12-8.

The second period was plagued with close calls and mistakes from both sides. Europe whiffed on some chances, including Jannik Hansen flubbing a breakaway. But none were more egregious than this shot by John Tavares directly into the iron:

Yikes.

Canada entered intermission down 1-0, and getting outshot 27-21.

The third period saw more of the same: Europe bending but not breaking, Canada pushing but not connecting, Halak making a series of tough saves.

But then Anze Kopitar was whistled for holding and Canada had the power play it needed.

In the end, the World Cup of Hockey ended the only way it could have: With drama, with a challenge to the host nation but, in the end, with the Canadian flag raised the rafters as the anthem played.


Greg Wyshynski is a writer for Yahoo Sports. Contact him at puckdaddyblog@yahoo.com or find him on Twitter. His book, TAKE YOUR EYE OFF THE PUCK, is available on Amazon and wherever books are sold.

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([personal profile] yhlee Sep. 29th, 2016 09:56 pm)
I picked up Sean Danker's Admiral out of a mistaken belief that it had an amnesiac protagonist. Wait, no, don't run away! I like amnesiac protagonists. But it turns out that I had misapprehended the jacket copy. In all fairness, the jacket copy doesn't eliminate the possibility that the protagonist is amnesiac, but that is not, in fact, what's going on.

Admiral opens with our nameless protagonist waking up unexpectedly on a starship with three recently-graduated trainees from Evagard, which has recently won a war with the Commonwealth. That's the good news. The bad news? The ship appears to be completely marooned. Neither our protagonist nor the trainees has any idea how they ended up where they are. And then things start to go wrong.

This turned out to be quite a page-turner, as the "honorary admiral" uses all his skills of persuasion and improvisation to chivvy the trainees along as they careen from one near-disaster to the next using the resources available--and the stakes just get higher and higher. If you enjoy space adventure with banter and tense action, definitely give this a look. I wish there had been more about the world, but it would have slowed down the action. Instead, Danker adroitly feeds us tantalizing details bit by bit. It's very well done. It also leaves me hungry either for more in this setting or for a next book that is heavier on the worldbuilding.

The author bio says that Danker served in the Air Force. I'm not surprised. This book abounds in attention to what I can only call mechanical detail--the awareness that a starship is going to be made of parts, which might break, or can be repurposed, or can be damaged, or have to be routed around. I'm always aware that whenever I write about starshippy things, everyone can tell that I don't have a damn clue. (I still haven't figured out what you call the "walls" on a boat. I also keep mixing up port and starboard, although I guess that stands to reason since I also mix up left and right. My husband's parents, who own a sailboat, find me very entertaining.) Now, I can't tell whether the details make sense, but Danker writes with such conviction that I believe him--and to be honest, I tend to suspect that he thought everything out. Someone with a more mechanical/engineering background is going to have to be the judge of that, though. I majored in math so I wouldn't have to deal with physical things. :p

Refreshingly, although there are castes and genetic engineering, there's a sense of compassion in the protagonist's understanding of humanity. Unlike the trainees, he expects that people from the Commonwealth are just people like anyone else, not monsters. There's also a great comic scene where everyone is speculating on what the Empress of Evagard looks like and whether she has a harem and is it men or women or both.

In any case, some of my random library picks end up getting returned unfinished. This was a delightful surprise. I enjoyed it a lot, and I'll be looking forward to more from Danker in the future!

[cross-post: Patreon]
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zvi: television: TV Critic (television critic)
([personal profile] zvi Sep. 29th, 2016 10:31 pm)
I read two comics today. The first was the Josie and the Pussycats. Predictably, I loved it. I think it's a really good modernization of the material. I'm afraid they might be churning through story a little bit fast, but hopefully that will settle down after the first issue. The art was pretty thoroughly unremarkable, there was a little bit of same face, but it'll do.

I also read the most recent Jem and the Holograms and the story was as good as ever, but, by his noodly appendage, I don't know if I'm going to make it with this new artist. It's not actively repellent, but I don't like how loose the work is, and, again, I feel like we're not getting a real lean into the body diversity that has been a series hallmark. I really don't want to miss the upcoming story arc, but I really am not feeling the art. I'll probably at least buy the rest of this arc in single issues, but then I may switch to trade waiting until they get a new artist.

I also stopped my Lumberjanes subscription. I realized I was hoping for "a reason" to quit. I had actually been planning to quit before the last arc, but I read the first issue of it and wanted to see how it turned out. But when I realized I was seriously hoping to get out, I remembered that comics aren't obligatory, and I pulled the plug.

Also on probation, Pitch. I'm interested in watching Pitch as a show about Ginny Baker, and there were about three storylines about other people tonight. I don't care, and I'm going to be mad if all of her relationships in the present revolve around white people. I'll watch next week, but I'm not committed.
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